BEING BLACK IN FASHION

Being a black person is already a day-to-day struggle of its own. Working in an industry with an abundance of western beauty standards, a low, but upcoming diversity rate and a system catered to the rich and privileged doesn’t make things easier. Among many reasons, colorism, prejudice, racism and financial obstacles are some of which have contributed to the lack of diversity within the fashion industry. This absence has eventually resulted in black individuals viewing each other as threats in working environments, whether they are competitive or not. Because according to society, there can only be enough space for one black individual in a somewhat powerful position.

Nonetheless, we can’t deny the pleasing changes in today’s industry, where the CFDA annual diveristy reports show an increasing amount of different races, sizes and even gender identities in fashion shows for every year that goes.

Two of the most disscused milestones for the black community include black designer Virgil Abloh joining the biggest fashion house, Louis Vuitton, as their menswear creative director and Edward Enninful became the first black editor-in-chief for British Vogue. All of this goes to show that we’ve definitely come a long way, but we still have a lot more than a leap left to achieve an industry that truly reflects the different cultures and shades our diverse word.

Nonetheless, a step towards inclusivity and diversity, no matter how small it may be, shouldn't be looked down upon.

SUITED MAGAZINE SPRING 2015: MODEL CITIZENS
MODELS: ATONG ARJOK, MARI MALEK, MARI AGORY, NYKHOR PAUL
PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL JUNG
STYLIST: JESSICA WILLIS

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