Five Things You Can Do Today to Slow Hair Loss

For many, a thick head of hair is a crowning achievement. That’s why it can be so difficult to find symptoms of sudden and unexpected hair loss. Whether you’re just beginning to notice a few more strands on your brush than normal or you’ve been diagnosed with a medical condition such as androgenic alopecia, there are small and simple steps you can take to keep your hair as healthy as possible and slow the progression of loss. Here are five ways to take control of the issue today:

For many, a thick head of hair is a crowning achievement. That’s why it can be so difficult to find symptoms of sudden and unexpected hair loss. Whether you’re just beginning to notice a few more strands on your brush than normal or you’ve been diagnosed with a medical condition such as androgenic alopecia, there are small and simple steps you can take to keep your hair as healthy as possible and slow the progression of loss. Here are five ways to take control of the issue today:

1. Take a look at your diet.

While some medical conditions cannot be reversed by diet alone, there are tweaks you can make to yours to promote growth and keep healthy strands intact. Consider your current diet. If you’re not getting enough protein, now is the time to make the change. If you’re consuming more empty calories from fast-food or convenience items than you should be, you might not be getting the nutrients your body, including your scalp, needs to stay in top shape.

Start by making small incorporations of fish, eggs and meat into your meals, along with a glass or two of milk, to up your protein consumption. While you’re at it, look for foods that are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids to amplify the results. Specific types of seafood, including salmon and mackerel, are excellent choices in this regard. You might find it easier to slowly incorporate these foods into your current diet rather than totally overhauling your existing routine. Why? You’ll be more likely to stick with it in the long run rather than burning out over a too-strong start.

2. Schedule a doctor’s visit.

If you have unexplained hair loss, it’s important not to sweep it under the rug. Even if you don’t feel physically unwell, it could be a sign of a hormonal imbalance and in this case, you’ll require medical attention. Your doctor will be able to conduct an exam to check for other signs of an imbalance and notify you about the proper next steps to take for treatment.

If your hormones appear to be in balanced, working condition, your doctor may uncover another underlying cause of the hair loss. From thyroid disease to anemia, there are myriad health concerns that list hair loss as a primary side effect, so it’s worth getting checked out by a physician you trust. Your doctor can also use this time to recommend therapy and treatment procedures, such as low-level laser therapy, which you can read more here about.

During your checkup, be sure to talk openly with your doctor about any concerns or questions you might have. Opening up this line of conversation is critical to proactively managing your health and ensuring your healthcare provider understands your history, background and any current issues and concerns.

3. Adjust your habits.

Do you make it a habit to drink plenty of water every day? If you find it impossible or uncomfortable to reach your recommended 64 daily ounces, you might be able to adjust that amount after speaking with your doctor. Still, studies reveal that most people don’t drink nearly that amount. If instead you’re filling up on alcohol, that habit could be negatively affecting your hair loss as well.

Both alcohol and caffeine, if consumed in large quantities, inhibit your immune system and you need that to be functioning at top capacity to promote healthy hair growth. So, cut back to only one or two drinks per day and see if that makes a difference for your hair loss. Along the same lines, now is the time to kick that smoking habit to the curb. Why? Nicotine reduces your circulation, and that also includes the blood going to your scalp, designed to encourage follicles to grow.

4. Start a vitamin regimen.

If you eat a balanced diet full of the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, you might be getting all of the vitamins and minerals you need. On the other hand, if you find it difficult to meet these daily quotas, you can supplement with vitamins to help boost your immune system and keep your levels in check.

Not sure where to start? Vitamins essential to hair health include B12 and Vitamin A. The former helps your body create red blood cells while the latter promotes a strong circulatory system.

If you’re going the diet route, look for leafy greens and eggs to provide you plenty of Vitamin A. Those who need more B12 can find it in fish, meat, poultry and milk. Also look for minerals including calcium, copper and zinc among others.

5. Find ways to destress.

Have you ever heard a tired mother claim that her children are going to make her hair fall out? Turns out, there’s some truth to that statement. Though it isn’t always the culprit, high levels of stress can exacerbate existing symptoms of hair loss. That said, find ways to ease your stress levels as much as possible. From taking a yoga class to taking a walk, just getting outside in nature is often enough of a scenic change to jumpstart your relaxation.

As you calm your mind, remember to also workout your body. When you exercise regularly, you’ll sweat and allow your hair pores to unclog along the way!

Taking Proactive Control of Your Hair Loss

Ultimately, responding to your hair loss can look many different ways. You might be fine with a few diet and lifestyle adjustments or you might require a doctor-recommended medical therapy treatment. Regardless, it’s worth a call into your doctor today to determine what’s causing the hair loss and ways you can move forward in confidence.

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