Pucci’s designs and garments have always been influenced by art. Born in a wealthy and aristocratic environment, the designer was in constant contact with artists and amazing artworks. Pucci sought inspiration in different art pieces, such as Rousseau’s exotic landscapes, but also in his travelling. His famous patterns, for example, deeply relate with Florence’s renaissance art ( Figure 29 and 30) and Sicily’s mosaics ( Figure 31 and 32). In addition, his color palette reflects the sceneries that he observed in his trips ( Figure 33).


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One can draw many relationships between the different art movements and his garments. Nevertheless, there is one that cannot be ignored and appears in most of his collections. The relationship between Pucci’s designs and the psychedelic art movement can be observed in every single pattern and it serves as a clear example of how art can influence fashion ( Figure 34, 35 and 36).


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Led by Larry Carlson ( Figure 37) and Michael Whelan ( Figure 38), the psychedelic art movement is a subcultural movement of the 60’s that seeks to create new points of view and ideas regarding nature. Born as a new way of understanding aesthetics and the art’s functionality, the idea behind it is to create a free world, with new laws and without gravity. The movement is characterized by the use of strong and contrasting colors, optical vibrating effect of graphic lines, the use of curvilinear shapes and the mutation of objects and patterns ( Figure 39).

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The psychedelic art movement has a big impact on fashion and offers an authentical change. This shift can be observed in the establishment of short skirts and dresses, the prints and colors of the clothes ( Figure 40).

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Nevertheless, it has particular and strong influence on Pucci’s work: “He uses an art style influenced by the prevalence of hallucinatory drugs, especially LSD, with typical designs featuring abstract swirls of intense color with curvilinear calligraphy reminiscent of Art Nouveau.” The relationship between the designer and this art movement is so evident that Pucci’s designs are “the equivalent of psychedelia without the drug”.


The designer is very skilful and manages to both absorb different types of influences and mix them around. “ The Psychedelic aesthetic in print has been perceived long before the synthesis of LSD- Pucci had made his name by creating a pattern of organic and geometric motifs in acid-bright colours overlaid with Easter influences” ( Figure 41 and 42).


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This important influence can be clearly observed in the S/S15 Ready-to-wear collection. The creative director includes a big variety of bright colors, mini dresses, prints and lie-dye prints that take us back to “the late 60s and 70s when this colorful house exploded onto the collective fashion psyche.” ( Figure 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 and 50)

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The influence of the psychedelic movement demonstrates the importance of the relationship between art and fashion. The link between them can be portrayed as a meeting point: both can serve as inspiration sources, whether from the texture, colors, sensations, projections and shapes or the exhibition itself. Both are aesthetic expressions because the two of them share the intention of actually wanting to express something.

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Trends have been around for a long time: the main aim behind this well-known concept is to dictate what people should wear. They are developed in terms of practicality and what works for a brand. There is an ease about this approach because it is quite inclusive and constructs an amazing commercial strategy.

The trends can be interpreted in different ways and transmitted through different types of formats, such as social media, traditional reports and tv shows. However, it is crucial to understand that the catwalk is the most important and influential one.

Designers use catwalks and fashion shows to both expose and impose these “new” trends. Nevertheless, most of them relate to the idea of reviving a historical movement. By the 1960’s, designers finish exploring the different type of shapes and as a consequence, have to start reviving past tendencies. A lot of the catwalk trends look new and and offer innovation. However, most designers pick up old tendencies and just use new materials and styling.

This idea can be clearly observed when analyzing the SS16 September fashion shows. Pucci, for example, is one of many brands that introduce the reptilian skin handbags as a new trend ( Figure 16 and 17). Well know brands such as Elie Saab ( Figure 18), Céline ( Figure 19), Dolce & Gabbana ( Figure 20) and Bottega Veneta ( Figure 21) also include it in their runway shows but, the truth is that this trend exists since the 1900’s.


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In order to understand this trend, it is crucial to explore the history behind the handbag and the cultural context. Handbags have been around since forever, but it is during the Victoria period that they are recognized as an essential accessory. Throughout the 19th century, and with the help of the industrial revolution, new methods/techniques are developed and implemented, therefore adapting bags to necessity.

The use of crocodile and other reptile skins become ubiquitous in the of luxury. The tendency to include them in handbags appears in the 1920’s (Figure 22) and is so strong that brands actually start using different type of leather to imitate the texture of these skins. It is in this decade were, as a symbol of luxury, Hermes’ Birkin and Kelly gain popularity (Figure 23 and 24).

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The use of crocodile and other reptile skins become ubiquitous in the of luxury. The tendency to include them in handbags appears in the 1920’s ( Figure 22) and is so strong that brands actually start using different type of leather to imitate the texture of these skins. It is in this decade were, as a symbol of luxury, Hermes’ Birkin and Kelly gain popularity (Figure 23 and 24).

During the 30’s, manufacturers continue developing the technique and snake, alligator and crocodile skin handbags become available in a huge range of colors and shapes ( Figure 25, 26 and 27). Throughout the rest of this first period, there is a continual exploration of the dyeing process and a rise in popularity of snakeskin. In addition, Hermes manages to dominate the market: their bags become a status symbol.


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Additionally, it is also important to highlight the fact that the use of snakeskin in handbags is also increased by the post-war contexts. The two World Wars have a strong influence: thanks to the existent austerity and leather rationing, this type of skin becomes more popular ( Figure 28).

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Throughout the second period of the 20th century, the handbags become the new symbol of status and elitism.  Therefore, Giorgetti’s decision to revive this trend is a very smart move: bags are difficult to imitate and fake, specially if they are made out of this expensive material. We are now facing a “ handbag boom”: people use these items to fit in and define their position.

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Massimo Giorgetti, Pucci’s new creative director and MSMG designer, offers a new and refreshed glance. The S/S16 Ready-to-Wear collection was shown at Milan’s Fashion Week last September and provided us with a sneak-peek of what is yet to come.

There are several key trends within the collection. It is essential to highlight the fact that there is a certain rupture within the design: Giorgetti is not afraid to introduce new ideas and concepts. Nevertheless, there is a clear continuity regarding the brand’s heritage, fashion history and the cultural context in which the brand was created.

The designs expose a new handwritten logo that replaces the traditional “ Emilio Pucci” signature ( Figure 1). Additionally, they also show a disruption regarding the classic sexy sixties print. With the help of this new collection, the designer manages to introduce more of a grunge and cool look ( Figure 2).

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It is inevitable for one to relate these aspects with the brand’s heritage. Ever since its establishment, the patterns and usage of colors have been the brand’s distinctive element. Emilio Pucci implemented these by seeking inspiration in different art pieces ( e.g. Rousseau’s savage landscapes and exotic scenery) and his travelling ( Figure 4) . As a matter of fact, the constant use of yellow, red and orange and the combination of these with blue, green, white and pink are a clear reflection of the impact that this travelling had on his creations ( Figure 5).


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It is inevitable for one to relate these aspects with the brand’s heritage. Ever since its establishment, the patterns and usage of colors have been the brand’s distinctive element. Emilio Pucci implemented these by seeking inspiration in different art pieces ( e.g. Rousseau’s savage landscapes and exotic scenery) and his travelling ( Figure 4) . As a matter of fact, the constant use of yellow, red and orange and the combination of these with blue, green, white and pink are a clear reflection of the impact that this travelling had on his creations ( Figure 5).


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Furthermore, a lot of pieces from this collection present asymmetry ( Figure 6, 7 and 8). This is important because it provides the idea that Giorgetti also makes reference to the brand’s cultural context. By implementing this key trend, the designer emphasizes Pucci’s idea of modern women (Figure 9). The garments both continue to accentuate sensuality and look extremely comfortable and light, therefore upholding the idea of freedom and offering a sense of liberation.


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This cultural contextualization makes reference to the Post-War context in which Pucci designs, where there is a constant need for change and new forms. In addition, Giorgetti's constant use of color also shows the influence that the psychedelic cultural trend has on the brand ( Figure 10 and 11).

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Giorgetti includes a big amount of beadwork and pattern in the collection ( Figure 12 and 13). It is important to mention this because these key trends have a lot to do with the history of fashion. Pucci’s classic patterns and beadwork ( Figures 14 and 15) represent a real breakthrough in fashion history: the incorporation of different locations as source of inspiration, the mixture of colors and fabrics, and the combination of historical art with designs create unique and exquisite patterns. These patterns represent a clear trend that is still present today.

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