Only one book per category — only one category per book. Bring it on!

  1. A book with more than 500 pages
  2. A book published in 2017
  3. A book about language
  4. A book at the bottom of my to-read list
  5. A book my mother loves
  6. A book about physics
  7. A biography
  8. A book published in the year I was born
  9. A book about sports
  10. A book from my childhood
  11. A book with an elephant on the cover
  12. A book I own but am yet to read
  13. A collection of poems
  14. A book by an author with the same initials as myself
  15. A play
  16. A book about psychology
  17. A book that was banned at some point
  18. A book I started but never finished
  19. A book about philosophy
  20. A book recommended to me by a friend
  21. An anthology of short stories
  22. A book of letters
  23. A book with a red spine
  24. A book older than 1 000 years
  25. A classic romance
  26. A book turned film
  27. A book with a number in its title
  28. A book with nonhuman characters
  29. A book by a transgendered author
  30. A book with a one-word title
  31. A book set in Slovenia
  32. A popular author's first book
  33. A book I have yet to read by a favourite author
  34. A book that won the Pulitzer Prize
  35. A book based on true events
  36. A book published over 100 years ago
  37. A book with a beautiful cover
  38. A book I was supposed to read in school, but didn't
  39. A book with antonyms in its title
  40. A book with bad reviews
  41. A book set in the future
  42. A book with a colour in its title
  43. A book containing magic
  44. A book from a series
  45. A book by an author I've never heard of
  46. A book set in my hometown
  47. A book originally written in another language
  48. A book set during Christmas
  49. A book turned TV-show
  50. A book by someone who committed suicide

This post will be updated as I go along~

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The absolutely brilliant Carrie Fisher passed away yesterday. This post was originally going to be a review of the new Star Wars film, but it stayed in my drafts for too long. I will still write it, but I will write it as a tribute to Fisher and her iconic portrayal of General Organa.

SPOILERS BELOW

My partner-in-crime and I have seen Star Wars: Rogue One a couple of times now, and I want to talk about it for a bit. I really liked this film, and it triggered something in me that I will try to put into words. Rebellion, revolution, is central to the story, and Jyn Erso embodies this as she is willing to die for what is right. We don't find out much about any of the other characters, but that only strengthens the essence of revolution to me: revolution requires sacrifice, which is something that the Rebel council had forgotten, and our generation has forgotten it as well. A scene from Les Miserables comes to mind, where Enjolras, the leader of the revolution, sums this up perfectly:

I suppose his words are quite harsh, but they resonate with me. "The whole is greater than the sum of its parts", as Aristotle said, meaning that whatever we do together is greater than what we do by ourselves. Carrie Fisher as Leia Organa understands this essential part of changing the universe (or getting anything done, really), and she honours the lives given for the rebellion in the mightiest way: she never stops fighting. Her planet getting destroyed only makes her fight harder. When Ben Solo is lost to the Dark Force, Han leaves and goes back to smuggling goods, and Luke leaves for God-knows-where. Meanwhile, Leia fucking Organa refuses to give up neither her son nor the Resistance, earning the title of General while never losing hope of her son returning to the Light and to her. She is changed by loss, but not defeated. She keeps believing in the whole, that it is only when we are together that we can change the world. Like Jyn Erso, Leia Organa acknowledges that there is a higher cause, and that it is worth sacrificing for.

I will conclude this rambling about revolution with a letter written by Che Guevara to his children.

To my children

Dear Hildita, Aleidita, Camilo, Celia, And Ernesto,
If you ever have to read this letter, it will be because I am no longer with you. You practically will not remember me, and the smaller ones will not remember me at all. Your father has been a man who acted on his beliefs and has certainly been loyal to his convictions. Grow up as good revolutionaries. Study hard so that you can master technology, which allows us to master nature. Remember that the revolution is what is important, and each one of us, alone is worth nothing. Above all, always be capable of feeling deeply any injustice committed against anyone, anywhere in the world. This is the most beautiful quality in a revolutionary.

Until forever, my children. I still hope to see you.
A great big kiss and a big hug from,
Papa

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Hello again~ I've spent some time in Gothenburg with my relatives, mostly eating and watching films. We saw Some like it hot — my absolute favourite — and luckily, my relatives loved it! It's a 1959 comedy film starring Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and it is one of the funniest and prettiest films I've ever seen. It starts off in Chicago 1929 with a police raid on a mobster-owned bar, which leaves Joe and Jerry, a saxophonist and a trombonist, out of work. The only job available is with a female band, and since Joe and Jerry are getting more desperate as winter approaches, they dress up as women and follow the orchestra to Florida. The film is hilarious without being mean, which I think is why it's timeless. I mean, Adam Sandler won't be remembered in 50 years, and neither will these recent films where the joke is (I think?) that Zac Efron is a douchebag. But this film lives on, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon live on, Marilyn Monroe lives on, and Zac Efron shall perish in the flames of shallow stupidity.

Anyway, I had a lovely time. Today is laundry day, which means that there are clothes hung up to dry all over our apartment, and everything smells nice. Even our dog smells nice on days like these, in spite of her newfound love for yellow snow. Who can be pissed at her, really?

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Christmas is lovely, isn't it? I mean, if we ignore the mass-consumption and the massive anxiety that people feel regarding Christmas presents, then it is quite lovely. My teacher rescheduled the lecture yesterday, so I spent the day drawing Christmas cards and setting up our Christmas "tree", which just is a potted plant.

But isn't an ordinary Christmas tree a potted plant, or a plant in a vase? Where is the line drawn between plants and trees? Google tells me that trees are a type of plant, meaning that all trees are plants but not all plants are trees. Trees are also different from all other plants in that they have a hard, wooden stem, whereas other plants have soft stems. Well, I'm no biologist, but this seems to indicate that most people keep a huge, decorated plant with a hard stem in their livingroom in these Christmasy times, and my plant just happens to be smaller and have a soft stem. It's all the same (it isn't, but let's ignore that. Come on, it's Christmas).

I don't know where I'm going with this. What I do know is that I'm not doing what I'm supposed to do right now, so byebye for now~

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Swedish education has a whole lot of issues, we all know that. But there is one thing that has bothered me all my life: mediocrity. Rather, the expectation of mediocrity. There is a very common expression in both Swedish and English, which is "aim for the moon; if you miss, you'll land among the stars" ("sikta mot stjärnorna så når du trädtopparna"). However, Swedish education seems to tell students to "aim for the table; if you miss, you will get to sit down comfortably in a chair of low expectations".

I saw this happen at a lecture this week. The teacher asked us to say the name of the linguistic feature of a word on her PowerPoint, and one student gave her the right answer, but the teacher told the student that they were too specific (she did it in a very condescending way, too). Imagine if she had shown us a picture of a gun and asked what it was, and told the students who said it was a gun that they were too specific; it is a weapon! Now, what does this tell the other students in the room? Not only does it tell them that they don't have to know a whole lot, but it also tells them that they shouldn't. This trend can also be seen in lowering expectations in order to give students better grades, instead of finding out why students fail to meet expectations.

These expectations (or lack thereof) creates a society in which stupidity is totally fine. No wonder we have a whole page dedicated to horoscopes in almost every newspaper. No wonder people get away with "creating their own truth". No wonder people think that vaccines will give their child autism, or think that Bob Dylan is even eligible for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Just because people have access to the internet does not mean that their opinion is fact, and that this "fact" trumps the facts presented by scientists, researchers, and other people who actually know what they're talking about.

Shallow stupidity is celebrated in TV-shows such as Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Paradise Hotel, and all the housewives in all the places. People are constantly told that being famous is everything, no matter the cost — which will also make you rich, which is "yay!" in capitalist societies. Some argue that it's the people's own responsibility not to get influenced by the messages in the media, but I ask: how in the world will people be able to analyse things critically if their education has failed them? If education has turned mediocre, how can the people be anything but?

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There is a certain kind of tranquillity that can only be found in the resting places of the dead. For that reason, I have loved graveyards ever since I was a little girl. I walk through an old cemetery when I walk from the bus stop to university, and I find myself captivated by most of the tombstones. They make me long for death (in a very non-destructive way). My new hobby is to look for interesting tombstones, and I want to share some of them here.

Learn from death to live.​

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