Eija, Johanna & Lovisa

Due to the illegal content uploaded on the blog “Boatlife” and the spread of inaccurate information, we, the government of the great United States, have taken permanent control of this blog. It will be audited under law 576, paragraph 27, sentence 8, and then deleted. The involved parties will be found and put to justice. Their safety cannot be ensured but justice will be put to ease. Let this be an example for future attempts of spreading unlawful information.

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We know our absences have been shining through your screens due to the lack of updates these recent weeks but we’ve been really busy trying to adapt to our new life on our houseboat. But now we’re back!

Living secluded, with only two other people to talk to have been quite frustrating. The days are all the same and so is the view. Water is the only thing you’ll ever see, no matter where you look, and even though hours may seem to have past and miles have been travelled, the surrounding stays the same. Sometimes it feels like we are stuck in a never ending circle. We do tend to see other people from time to time, but the distrust that is felt towards the government have now been turned to anyone you meet. A wave or nod is often the only human contact you’ll receive from other people, outside of your home.

But what’s been the hardest for of all of us is the management of a food source. All three of us agreed that farming a small garden on the balcony of our boat would be the best way to live a sustainable life at sea, but what we didn’t expect was how hard it would be. Because of global warming, the weather has turned unpredictable and one day can contain weather from all four seasons. This week, we’ve been through both snow and sunshine!

To protect our plantation from the harshness of the weather, we’re planning to build some form of roof over our small garden but finding good materials for it all is almost impossible. Luckily, we didn’t have to look for long as we had packed some wood planks and tin, just enough to cover the whole garden. While it might seem like it, we’re not the handiest people you’ll ever meet but fortunate for us, another “houseboater” chose to stop by and give us a helpful hand.

They are few, but some people choose to ignore their distrust and are still willing to help out when they see someone in need of it.

Pictures borrowed from Google

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It is today 73 years since the last polar bear went extinct. While global warming was the key factor that forced them to leave their melting home and adapt to new environments and climates, humans were the ones who hunt them down and killed them for sport.

Today we pay tribute to our furry friends!

​Pictures borrowed from Google

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“Will we ever get a houseboat?” is a question we’ve asked ourselves many times, there have been moments where it all felt hopeless, where we almost gave up. But what we didn’t know was that eventually there would come a day when we would all stand on our very own “porch” of our houseboat and be the lucky owners of a houseboat.

Picture borrowed from Google

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The final bags have been backed, the boat has been loaded with essential items and we are ready to leave. During the last couple of days, I have walked more miles than I’ve ever walked in my life, and carried triple the amount of what I weigh. I don’t even know how sportsmen managed in the past. Anyway, it took us almost an entire week of arguing, packing and moving, but the last couple of moving cartoons are finally filled with the last items and we are ready to go!

Although, I am worried about being stuck on a boat at sea for the rest of my life with Eija and Lovisa. I love them but these last days have been hectic and filled with load arguments and fights, which can’t help me to wonder what these next couple of years will look like. Our world, believe it or not, is still quite artificial and packing your whole life down into a box can be quite hard when three people’s opinions are to be accounted for.

I just recorded a video where I talk about the feelings I have about leaving, it's weird and a little bit scary but at the same time I am very excited!

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Yesterday, we used our last piece of toilet paper. As the state of Massachusetts (and many other states and countries) has created a system of rations on everyday items, toilet paper included, it is hard to come by. And even if we could buy it in one of the few stores left, it would be cheaper to dry ourselves with money… That is if printed money still existed.

The moving day is coming closer and closer, and our names and moving higher up on the list, but without necessities like toilet paper or a solar driven water converter, we are starting doubt if survival at sea really will be possible. Can three lower class orphans really survive a life at sea, far away from land and help, and with an unpredictable weather?

250 years ago?

No.

But now?

Maybe.

For far too long, people has said that “It isn’t our responsibility” and “Won’t happen to me, so why should I be the one to enforce change?”. People grew accustomed to a specific lifestyle, and when the inevitable came knocking at our door, that’s when humans got off their high horses and started to do things.

So, ever since, we’ve grown up in a society that has been preparing us for this our whole lives. Ever since kindergarten, we’ve been taught how to adapt to the growing climate change. But it’s not just us. The whole society itself has changed, with mass production of floating devices, as well as an increase in technological inventions, as substitutes for everything that previously was a part of our everyday life.

Let’s go back to the subject of the hour; toilet paper.

Now, we’ve already established that the few existing stores are way too expensive and that the so-called “government rations” are close to useless. The black market could be an option if there were such a thing, but if the possibility would have existed, it would have been far too dangerous. As the majority of people in Boston fled in panic, many houses in our street are empty but filled with the treasures they left behind. Raiding houses are by far the easiest way to come by necessary missing items.

We wouldn’t call it our proudest moment, but how many times have people gone against social norms and laws just to survive? And if there is anything future generations need to understand, it is that we didn’t choose this. Our actions are based on what our great grandparents did to our planet. While we may not have done our best to help the earth survive further, they were the ones who put us in this situation and we did our best to give our future generations the hope to survive.

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Most of you already know how we ended up in this situation, but for future generations, this is what happened.

When the president of one of the world’s leading countries said that global warming was a hoax invented by China, and withdrew their funding for further research for it, more nations followed. Those few private organisations that still had money and opportunity tried their best to help but the greatest environmental catastrophe that this generation has ever seen was soon to great to be stopped. The sea levels started to rise and soon, most of the land area disappeared resulting in a massive amount of people to lose their homes, including us. This also resulted in the greatest refugee catastrophe since the war in Syria. As boarders kept closing, the poorest people in the world were the most vulnerable to death and those who could afford sought refugee towards the oceans. However, not all people were affected, some found safety in the mountains and the wealthiest have been able to find land to live on, which shows the irony of this disaster; the one’s who caused it are the one’s who are the safest.

Most scientists predicted that it would take 5,000 years for the earth to become an ice-free planet, and with an average temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit, instead of the 58 degrees Fahrenheit that we had in 2013. But with mass consumption and the world economy being prioritised before the already fragile environment, the sea levels started to rise 60% faster than what was anticipated.

And here we are. In a queue, trying to find a houseboat so we can continue to live our lives. 6 months ago we put our names on the government’s list to get a houseboat, but even if our names are officially high up on that list, the people with the money and status are always prioritized. Desperation is everywhere and what is left of Boston is crumbling apart through it and corruption.

Picture borrowed from Google

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